Category Archives: Northern Territory

The Adelaide River is located in the Northern Territory, unlike its name suggests. It is an area of calm, quiet and crocodiles. Every day tourists come to see the jumping crocs. I arrived in Adelaide River in the wet season, so there was only a small group going on the crocodile cruise and therefore we got the small boat. Before setting off on our adventure, we got to meet some of the other inhabitants of the area; some house snakes you could give a cuddle if you were interested. And then the cruise… Our captain was a real character, the bush type. His commentary was like an old cassette, in a monotone voice. It seemed to be on repeat as he kept saying the crocodiles could be anywhere. Even if they say a place is safe to swim, there are probably crocodiles. Way to make us tourists feel safe! Apart…

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Termite mounds. I could think of more exciting things. Yet when you’re travelling, termite mounds can suddenly be a highlight of your trip. In The Netherlands we don’t have termite mounds, or anything remotely similar. To me termite mounds are associated with vast spaces and rough nature. I was delighted to see the dozens of termite mounds in Australia and going to the Litchfield national park made it even better! I saw a mound called the cathedral. It’s about 5 meters high and built with a mixture of sand, termite spit and termite poo. This results in a rockhard mix which creates their homes. A short walk away was a big field with tall, bright green grass. Hidden amongst the grass were huge magnetic termite mounds. Even in termite mounds you have bigger and better and the magnetic ones are in that category because most of the mounds in the…

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Nitmiluk national park, or Katherine gorge, is a must do when you’re visiting the Northern Territory. The park has several walks, but the most famous place to walk to is probably Edith Falls, where you can go for a swim after the sweaty walk. The walk goes up towards the falls and in humid weather, jumping into the water is a real treat. It’s a playful swimming hole where you can swim underneath the waterfall or enjoy the small shoots and push yourself forwards over the rocks. Edith Falls Another really cool short walk to do is the Windolf walk, which starts from the visitor center and takes you into the Katherine gorge. In about an hour you walk towards a viewpoint of the gorge called Pat’s lookout. At times it’s pretty steep and during the wet there might be some water on the path. I did this walk in…

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The Devil’s Marbles or Karlu Karlu is one of the attractions along the Stuart highway, located south of Tennant Creek. Karlu Karlu means round boulders, and that is exactly what you’ll see. It’s a playground for grownups with wonderful photo opportunities. You can climb up some of the higher ones to get a pretty view over the area. It’s quite bizarre to see all these, sometimes perfectly round, boulders in an otherwise flat landscape. Did you know I’ve entered in the big blog exchange. Help me to win an exchange of blogs and life with another blogger from around the world. Vote by clicking the button here and then don’t forget to verify your vote via the email you’ll get. Thanks a million!!!!

Uluru is not the only attraction in Australia’s red center. Close by, and part of the same national park, is Kata Tjuta. Getting up early pays off as you have a beautiful opportunity to watch the sunrise in the desert here. Even though I was staying at a campsite close to the national park, the temperature dropped considerably when I arrived in Kata Tjuta. With the sun still tucked away the desert air was chilly. I was shivering in my shorts and spaghetti top, but knew that I would be boiling in a few hours. Kata Tjuta means ‘lots of heads’. From far away you see several big rocks all lined up and they could be seen as heads. The formation was formed years and years ago and rose into the air because of shifts in the earth. Getting closer you’ll get a better feeling for the size of the rocks.…

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They say Uluru looks different every time you visit it. It’s colors keep changing with the light, from red to purple and back. So before you leave this national park, make sure you’ve seen a sunset or sunrise. On my visit the rock looked bright red, almost orange, during the day. As the sun was setting it turned more towards purple. There is a special parking space for a good sunset view.  Don’t expect to have it all to yourself though. This secret already got out and there will be masses of people to share the moment with!

Ayers Rock, Uluru… two names for the same thing. Australia is using the Aboriginal names for its national parks more and more. With respect for the original inhabitants of the country comes changing names and changing rules. Where climbing Ayers Rock used to be a highlight on an Australia itinerary, more and more people respect the wishes of the Aboriginal people not to climb Uluru these days. Tour guides and the visitor center will advise against climbing the rock. Not only is it extremely unsafe, but Uluru is also a sacred place to the local Aboriginal people. A white stripe covers the red rock, a trail left behind by all the climbers that have gone up. It stands out and it doesn’t belong. Coming closer you’ll see the chain that helps people climb. The rock is very steep in certain areas and people occasionally fall to their death. Uluru is in…

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A must do on route to Darwin is the Daly Waters Pub. The pub has always been an important stop for drovers and travellers alike. It’s the oldest pub in the Northern Territory and it has become a popular stop for tourists visiting the outback. What makes the place so iconic is the items that previous travellers have left behind. Bras, underwear, T-shirts, thongs, car parts, license plates… if you can think of it, you will probably find it. Walking around the dark pub you’ll find them all over the walls and ceilings. Besides this, there are all sorts of funny signs and historic items spread around the property. It’s a cool place to explore and I bet you’d find something new on every visit! If you’re really keen you could even refresh the bar and leave something behind yourself.    

The east coast of Australia might be the number one backpacker route, but there is more to this dry continent. To really explore what’s out there in the desert, you should take a road trip between Adelaide and Darwin. The quirky towns and curiosities along the way are well worth the effort. You’ll see a side of Oz that you’ll never forget. Departing from Adelaide you follow the footsteps of the early explorers by taking the Stuart highway, also known as the explorer’s highway, for about 3000km before you arrive in Darwin. There are a lot of things to see along the way, and in the coming weeks, I’ll post about some of your options. I bet there is heaps more to explore, but these are just some of the amazing things I’ve seen along the road. This one is all about the road, not so much about the destination. First up are…

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On a roadtrip through the vast desert of Australia, surrounded by red sand, you don’t really expect to find thermal springs. Just south of Katherine, in the tropical area underneath Darwin, you can find Mataranka. It is a great stop to relax and soak after hours in the car. If you like the safety of a pool, there is a public thermal pool in Elsey national park. Although it is a manmade pool, it is surrounded by tropical plants and trees. Like your own little oasis in the desert, if you’re lucky. It can get quite busy. But not to worry, there is more. After soaking until you’re wrinkled, you can go for a walk along the botanic trail. It is an easy walk that leads to the river. Don’t swim here because the crocs will be waiting. If you’re lucky you might spot one. Besides crocodiles there are heaps…

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